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"Always" Low Wages! The High Cost of Wal-Mart

Workers at Wal-Mart, smiling TV faces notwithstanding, are getting a raw deal. The average wage of a Wal-Mart hourly worker is less than $9 an hour, and many must depend on public assistance to make ends meet, or for health care.
When Nov 11, 2005
from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 101 Pattee Library
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Liza Featherstone  Liza Featherstone

Independent Journalist and Activist, New York City, and author of Selling Women Short: The Landmark Battle for Workers' Rights at Wal-Mart

Liza Featherstone is a journalist based in New York City. Her work on student and youth activism has been published in The Nation, Lingua Franca, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Left Business Observer, Dissent, The Sydney Morning Herald and Columbia Journalism Review. Featherstone has also written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Newsday, In These Times, Ms., Salon, Nerve, US, Nylon and Rolling Stone. She is the co-author of Students Against Sweatshops: The Making of a Movement (Verso, 2002) and author of Selling Women Short: The Landmark Battle for Workers' Rights at Wal-Mart (Basic, 2004).

"Always" Low Wages! The High Cost of Wal-Mart

Workers at Wal-Mart, smiling TV faces notwithstanding, are getting a raw deal. The average wage of a Wal-Mart hourly worker is less than $9 an hour, and many must depend on public assistance to make ends meet, or for health care. Women, who make up the majority of Wal-Mart workers, also face sex discrimination: they are paid less than men in nearly every position at the company, despite higher performance ratings, and they are passed over for promotions: the percentage of women in company management in 1999–34%–matched that of rival retailers in 1975. Women describe appallingly archaic attitudes, with single mothers being told that male co-workers make more money because they have families to support. The largest private employer in the United States, Wal-Mart faces increasing organized public pressure to change its practices. Featherstone discusses Wal-Mart, its workers, and the organized resistance the company faces.