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Cognitive Liberty: What is the Future of Freedom of Thought in the Age of Neurocops, Brain Fingerprinting, Memory Management Drugs, and Hypersonic Sound?

Five years after the “Decade of the Brain,” new drugs and other technologies are making it possible to monitor and modulate thought processes in ways that hearken the best dreams and worst fears of science fiction and cyberpunk. These accelerating technological developments will change the parameters of freedom of thought as much as the printing press and the internet changed the parameters of freedom of speech.
When Apr 05, 2004
from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 101 Pattee Library
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Richard Glen BoireRichard Glen Boire is Director of the Center for Cognitive Liberty & Ethics and also serves as its chief legal counsel. He received his Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from the Boalt Hall, the School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1990.

Co-Director and Legal Counsel, Center for Cognitive Liberty & Ethics

Richard Glen Boire is Director of the Center for Cognitive Liberty & Ethics and also serves as its chief legal counsel. He received his Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from the Boalt Hall, the School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1990.

He has been admitted to practice in the United States Supreme Court, and filed the first-ever freedom of thought legal brief before the Court in 2002.

His scholarship and policy work focus on updating the legal notion of freedom of thought in light of ongoing scientific advancements related to understanding, monitoring, and modulating brain function.

Center for Cognitive Liberty & Ethics

Cognitive Liberty: What is the Future of Freedom of Thought in the Age of Neurocops, Brain Fingerprinting, Memory Management Drugs, and Hypersonic Sound?

Five years after the “Decade of the Brain,” new drugs and other technologies are making it possible to monitor and modulate thought processes in ways that hearken the best dreams and worst fears of science fiction and cyberpunk. These accelerating technological developments will change the parameters of freedom of thought as much as the printing press and the internet changed the parameters of freedom of speech.

Just as the internet, and the printing press before it, became a legal battleground over individual freedom versus government control, neurotechnology is about to raise new dimensions in what you are, and aren’t, allowed to do with your own thought processes.

This talk will navigate some of the most interesting questions constellated around the intersection of neurotechnology and the legal notion of freedom of thought.