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Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy

Kevin Bales is president of Free the Slaves, the U.S. sister organization of Anti-Slavery International (the world's oldest human rights organization), and professor of sociology at the University of Surrey Roehampton in London as well as serving on the Board of Directors of the International Cocoa Initiative
When Apr 16, 2004
from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Where 112 Chambers Building
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KEVIN BALES

President of Free the Slaves

Kevin Bales is president of Free the Slaves, the U.S. sister organization of Anti-Slavery International (the world's oldest human rights organization), and professor of sociology at the University of Surrey Roehampton in London as well as serving on the Board of Directors of the International Cocoa Initiative. His book, Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy published in 1999, was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and has now been published in ten other languages. Archbishop Desmond Tutu called it "a well researched, scholarly and deeply disturbing expose of modern slavery." His work won the Premio Viareggio for services to humanity in 2000, and the documentary based on his work won the Peabody Award for 2000 and two Emmy Awards in 2002. He is a Trustee of Anti-Slavery International and a consultant to the United Nations Global Program on Trafficking of Human Beings. Bales has been invited to advise the U.S., British, Irish, Norwegian, and Nepali governments, as well as the governments of the Economic Community of West African States, on the formulation of policy on slavery and human trafficking. He gained his Ph.D. at the London School of Economics. He is currently editing an Anti-Human Trafficking Toolkit for the United Nations, working with the chocolate industry to remove child and slave labor from the product chain, and writing on contemporary slavery (see for example his feature article in the April 2002 Scientific American).

Free the Slaves

Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy

This presentation will present preliminary findings from an NIJ sponsored research project into human trafficking in the United States. It will review new research on the importance of human trafficking in the world economy, and examine the "dark figure" of trafficking. Tentative findings from the research include the importance of intelligence in identifying trafficking cases, the importance of "good Samaritans," the gap between the number of cases federal agencies can prosecute and the actual number of cases, a lack of clear divisions of responsibility in the handling of trafficking cases, the importance of immediate medical examinations of trafficking victims, and a lack of basic tools to investigate and prosecute trafficking cases.