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Ethics Education

by admin Mar 06, 2015

The Richard B. Lippin Lecture Series: Moral Development in the Context of Group Games

When: Apr 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 111 Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, University Park, PA 16802

Group games are a vital aspect of constructivist early education, providing opportunities for academic learning (e.g., number, logical reasoning, spatial reasoning, literacy) as well as social and moral development. Dr. Hildebrandt will discuss the comparative benefits of cooperative and competitive games, and the importance of allowing children to create and regulate their own games within democratic, constructivist classrooms. The Richard B. Lippin Lecture Series: Moral Development in the Context of Group Games - Read More…

Sport Ethics Conference

Sport Ethics Conference

When: from Apr 06, 2017 10:00 AM to Apr 07, 2017 5:00 PM
Where: 110 Henderson Building, University Park, PA 16802

Join us at the Sport Ethics Conference to engage in a discussion on the integration of ethics into sports organizations and practices. Penn State sport practitioners and administrators will raise issues and ethical concerns that they face in their day-to-day engagement in sport. To help navigate the issues and concerns in a more ethically sound manner, world leading sport ethicist will provide a critical analysis of them. The following are some of the topics that will be explored: athletes’ role modeling, the pedagogical potential of sport participation, the environmental impact of sport events organization, and the commercialization of sport. Sport Ethics Conference - Read More…

Brown Bag Series - Empathy is a choice: The limits of empathy are more apparent than real

When: Mar 16, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

Empathy, or the ability to feel what others feel, is often seen as a powerful moral force. But what are its limits? Many studies find that empathy is less sensitive to large-scale suffering (e.g., natural disasters, genocides) and the suffering of racial and political out-groups. These empathy deficits have led some scholars to argue against empathy, concluding that it is an unreliable basis for moral action. In this talk, he suggest that limits on empathy are more apparent than real: what appear to be built-in “glitches" in empathy may instead be due to motivated choices we make to avoid empathy’s costs. He will present a motivational framework for understanding empathy, and will discuss evidence that seemingly fixed limits on empathy can shift depending on what we want, and choose, to feel. If empathy limits are flexible choices rather than fixed constraints, this challenges strong normative arguments against the usefulness of empathy in everyday life. He will conclude by discussing implications for ethical debates about empathy and future directions in research on empathy as a choice. Brown Bag Series - Empathy is a choice: The limits of empathy are more apparent than real - Read More…

Philosophy and Diversity: Implications and Questions for Education

When: Feb 28, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 301 D Huck Life Sciences Building, University Park, PA 16802

Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition

When: Feb 28, 2017 at 9:30 AM
Where: 216 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802

Are the medical protocols of gender transition grounded in Eurocentric conceptions of gender? This talk delves into the archive of Western medical sexology, examining the absence, misrecognition, and active erasure of queer and non-white subjects. Positioning this archive in relation to the modern/colonial gender system (Lugones 2007, 2010), Malatino explores how transnationally hegemonic models of gender transition are grounded in deeply partial, highly normative understandings of embodiment that produce several kinds of structural violence: the de-authorization of intersex and trans subjects as experts on their own experience, the necropolitical gatekeeping methods that stratify health care access and intensify the vulnerability of non-transnormative subjects, and the inadequate monitoring and systematic under-research of the health impacts that effect folks imbricated in networks of medicalized transition. How might we understand transition beyond Eurocentric medical logics? How might this re-cognition ameliorate certain forms of structural violence? Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition - Read More…

Colloquium: Morality in Language

When: Feb 24, 2017 at 1:15 PM
Where: 127 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802

When things go wrong, people ask, “Who made it happen?” “Who was responsible?” and often, “Who will pay?” That is, moral judgment engages causal cognition. How much of this process is influenced by higher-level factors such as people’s moral values and political ideology, and how much is influenced by stimulus-bound factors, such as the language used to describe the event? This talk will cover research combining individual differences measures with vignette-based and psycholinguistics tasks. Collectively, the research demonstrates: (1) moral values aimed at protecting group cohesiveness predict a shift in attributions of blame to victims; (2) altering the focus of language can reduce victim blame; and (3) values and ideology influence extraction of causal relationships from the most basic event descriptions. That participants’ behavior across these tasks systematically maps onto beliefs about the nature of right and wrong indicates that studying language can bring precision to our understanding of the unruly domain of morality, and also that our understanding of language is incomplete without consideration of moral psychology. Colloquium: Morality in Language - Read More…

How do we learn peace?

When: Feb 24, 2017 at 9:00 AM
Where: 129 Waring, University Park, PA 16802

Since 2009, the Outward Bound Peacebuilding has worked with partners around the world to design programs that integrate the Outward Bound educational model of learning by doing and reflecting, with peacebuilding skills and practice. Executive Director Ana Patel will present on the work and approach of Outward Bound Peacebuilding in an interactive session that explores this innovative approach to supporting and creating communities of peacebuilding leaders. How do we learn peace? - Read More…

Making Good: Can We Realize Our Moral Aspirations?

When: Feb 23, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Is moral improvement possible? If so, how? Recently, philosophers have suggested that virtue is a skill that can be acquired much as skills in other areas, like chess and music, are acquired. Philosophical proponents of this “skill analogy,” unfortunately, have paid limited attention to the science of human performance, science which may illuminate pathways and impediments to moral development. Here, I canvass some of the science, and assess some prospects for moral improvement. Making Good: Can We Realize Our Moral Aspirations? - Read More…

What if you could walk to peace?

When: Feb 23, 2017 at 3:15 PM
Where: 808 Ford Building, University Park, PA 16802

Outward Bound Center for Peacebuilding and Penn State University invite you to attend a workshop. Experiential Peacebuilding is an approach that applies experiential learning or "learning by doing and reflecting" to the challenge of building relationships between people on different sides of conflict. The theory behind this work is that the experiential learning can build common language, accelerate trust and facilitate positive experiences among adversaries. The workshop will offer participants a unique opportunity to explore this approach and consider its application as a powerful tool for creating transformational experiences for individuals and groups. What if you could walk to peace? - Read More…

Brown Bag Series - Beyond White Privilege: Geographies of White Supremacy and Settler Colonialism

When: Feb 16, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

This presentation builds from scholarship on whiteness and white privilege to argue for an expanded focus that includes settler colonialism and white supremacy. Specifically, Dr. Inwood will argue that engaging with white supremacy and settler colonialism reveals the enduring social, economic, and political impacts of white supremacy as a materially grounded set of practices that continues to frame the making of space and place in the United States. As a result, he will situate white supremacy not as an artifact of history or as an extreme position, but rather as the foundation for the continuous unfolding of practices of race and racism within settler states. Finally, he will illustrate this framework through a recent example of a land dispute in the American West. Brown Bag Series - Beyond White Privilege: Geographies of White Supremacy and Settler Colonialism - Read More…