The Rock Ethics Institute

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Home > Events > Event Collections > Ethics Education

Events

Ethics Education

by admin Mar 06, 2015

The Richard B. Lippin Lecture Series: Moral Development in the Context of Group Games

When: Apr 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 111 Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, University Park, PA 16802

Group games are a vital aspect of constructivist early education, providing opportunities for academic learning (e.g., number, logical reasoning, spatial reasoning, literacy) as well as social and moral development. Dr. Hildebrandt will discuss the comparative benefits of cooperative and competitive games, and the importance of allowing children to create and regulate their own games within democratic, constructivist classrooms. The Richard B. Lippin Lecture Series: Moral Development in the Context of Group Games - Read More…

Sport Ethics Conference

Sport Ethics Conference

When: from Apr 06, 2017 10:00 AM to Apr 07, 2017 5:00 PM
Where: 110 Henderson Building, University Park, PA 16802

Join us at the Sport Ethics Conference to engage in a discussion on the integration of ethics into sports organizations and practices. Penn State sport practitioners and administrators will raise issues and ethical concerns that they face in their day-to-day engagement in sport. To help navigate the issues and concerns in a more ethically sound manner, world leading sport ethicist will provide a critical analysis of them. The following are some of the topics that will be explored: athletes’ role modeling, the pedagogical potential of sport participation, the environmental impact of sport events organization, and the commercialization of sport. Sport Ethics Conference - Read More…

The End of All Things: A Phenomenology of Elemental Time

When: Mar 31, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802

Ted Toadvine, Nancy Tuana Director of the Rock Ethics Institute, presents his Inaugural Lecture. The End of All Things: A Phenomenology of Elemental Time - Read More…

Job Talk - Fishy Behavior: A Field Experiment on (Dis)honesty in the Marketplace

When: Mar 29, 2017 at 1:00 PM
Where: 12 Katz Building, University Park, PA 16802

We conduct a natural field experiment in fish markets where sellers frequently cheat on weight and face negligible economic penalty. Exploiting exogenous variations in fish prices, an indicator of marginal economic benefit from cheating, we examine how dishonest behavior varies with rising economic benefit from cheating. We find that most sellers cheat but that cheating almost never exceeds ten percent of purchased quantity, and that the value of cheating is small. The data reveal a non-monotonic relationship wherein cheating initially increases and thereafter decreases in the fish price. Job Talk - Fishy Behavior: A Field Experiment on (Dis)honesty in the Marketplace - Read More…

Rock Colloquia Series: Empathy is a choice - The limits of empathy are more apparent than real

When: Mar 16, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

Empathy, or the ability to feel what others feel, is often seen as a powerful moral force. But what are its limits? Many studies find that empathy is less sensitive to large-scale suffering (e.g., natural disasters, genocides) and the suffering of racial and political out-groups. These empathy deficits have led some scholars to argue against empathy, concluding that it is an unreliable basis for moral action. In this talk, he suggest that limits on empathy are more apparent than real: what appear to be built-in “glitches" in empathy may instead be due to motivated choices we make to avoid empathy’s costs. He will present a motivational framework for understanding empathy, and will discuss evidence that seemingly fixed limits on empathy can shift depending on what we want, and choose, to feel. If empathy limits are flexible choices rather than fixed constraints, this challenges strong normative arguments against the usefulness of empathy in everyday life. He will conclude by discussing implications for ethical debates about empathy and future directions in research on empathy as a choice. Rock Colloquia Series: Empathy is a choice - The limits of empathy are more apparent than real - Read More…

Job Talk - How much energy do we 'need'? Assessing the climate development conflict

When: Mar 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM
Where: 12 Katz Building, University Park, PA 16802

There is both confusion and concern regarding the relationship between poverty eradication and climate change. What impact will rising living standards have on greenhouse gas emissions? Will climate mitigation set back efforts to eradicate poverty? Academic research so far offers limited insights to these questions, partly because of how we frame the problem. There is a growing interest in relating human development directly to climate change, rather than through GDP. One key facet of this inquiry is, how much energy is ‘needed’ to eradicate poverty? In this presentation, I will contrast past and new research approaches, and offer new insights on the energy resource requirements to address multidimensional poverty. I will focus on three themes: first, I will propose the constituents of ‘decent living standards’ – the material requirements for human well-being – drawing from basic needs and capabilities approaches and global ‘preferences’. Second, I will discuss new findings on the potential synergies between eradicating ‘hidden’ hunger and mitigating climate change in India. Third, I will discuss the importance of the interaction between social and energy policies in assessing the equity and poverty impacts of national and international climate policy. This research informs not only future development policy priorities, but also provides a human rights perspective to assess fairness in global mitigation efforts. Job Talk - How much energy do we 'need'? Assessing the climate development conflict - Read More…

Job Talk - The economic impacts of large-scale water infrastructure improvements in urban Zarqa, Jordan

When: Mar 02, 2017 at 1:00 PM
Where: 12 Katz Building, University Park, PA 16802

Jordan is a highly water scarce country facing acute sectoral tradeoffs in water use. Consumers in Zarqa, the country’s second most populous urban area, typically receive water from the municipal piped network for fewer than 48 hours each week, and engage in a variety of costly coping strategies to mitigate the effects of water scarcity. Against this backdrop, the Millennium Challenge Corporation entered into a $275 million compact with the government of Jordan, to improve the technical performance of piped water infrastructure, and increase the collection, treatment and reuse of wastewater, with the ultimate goal of increasing water efficiency and reducing poverty. This paper presents early evidence on the effects of the Compact, based on data collected towards the end of the implementation period. We find evidence of several changes in areas subjected to the different infrastructure improvements, including reporting of improved water pressure, increased connection to the sewer network and reduced sewage backups, and substitution of the source of irrigation water in the Jordan Valley. We also find evidence of spillovers within Zarqa, compared to neighboring areas in Amman that are supplied by a separate utility. A key category of anticipated impacts – reduced spending on expensive alternatives to utility water – however does not appear to materialize, possibly due to low confidence in the safety of this network water. Though these results only correspond to short-term effects of this infrastructure improvement, they add to a scant body of rigorous evidence on the benefits of capital-intensive water infrastructure. Job Talk - The economic impacts of large-scale water infrastructure improvements in urban Zarqa, Jordan - Read More…

Job Talk - Global Grains: Feed, Food, and the World Economy

When: Mar 01, 2017 at 1:00 PM
Where: 12 Katz Building, University Park, PA 16802

Philosophy and Diversity: Implications and Questions for Education

When: Feb 28, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 301 D Huck Life Sciences Building, University Park, PA 16802

Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition

When: Feb 28, 2017 at 9:30 AM
Where: 216 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802

Are the medical protocols of gender transition grounded in Eurocentric conceptions of gender? This talk delves into the archive of Western medical sexology, examining the absence, misrecognition, and active erasure of queer and non-white subjects. Positioning this archive in relation to the modern/colonial gender system (Lugones 2007, 2010), Malatino explores how transnationally hegemonic models of gender transition are grounded in deeply partial, highly normative understandings of embodiment that produce several kinds of structural violence: the de-authorization of intersex and trans subjects as experts on their own experience, the necropolitical gatekeeping methods that stratify health care access and intensify the vulnerability of non-transnormative subjects, and the inadequate monitoring and systematic under-research of the health impacts that effect folks imbricated in networks of medicalized transition. How might we understand transition beyond Eurocentric medical logics? How might this re-cognition ameliorate certain forms of structural violence? Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition - Read More…