The Rock Ethics Institute

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Home > Events > Event Collections > Bioethics

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Bioethics

by admin Nov 20, 2014
Sport Ethics Conference

Sport Ethics Conference

When: from Apr 06, 2017 10:00 AM to Apr 07, 2017 5:00 PM
Where: 110 Henderson Building, University Park, PA 16802

Join us at the Sport Ethics Conference to engage in a discussion on the integration of ethics into sports organizations and practices. Penn State sport practitioners and administrators will raise issues and ethical concerns that they face in their day-to-day engagement in sport. To help navigate the issues and concerns in a more ethically sound manner, world leading sport ethicist will provide a critical analysis of them. The following are some of the topics that will be explored: athletes’ role modeling, the pedagogical potential of sport participation, the environmental impact of sport events organization, and the commercialization of sport. Sport Ethics Conference - Read More…

The End of All Things: A Phenomenology of Elemental Time

When: Mar 31, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802

Ted Toadvine, Nancy Tuana Director of the Rock Ethics Institute, presents his Inaugural Lecture. The End of All Things: A Phenomenology of Elemental Time - Read More…

Caring Across Species: Cripping Animal Ethics

When: Mar 24, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Through painting, printmaking, writing and other forms of political and artistic engagement, Taylor's work intervenes with dominant historical narratives of disability and animal oppression. This talk examines points of intersection between disability studies, animal ethics, and environmental studies, asking how art and creative research can open up new avenues of solidarity across species and ability.  Caring Across Species: Cripping Animal Ethics - Read More…

Rock Colloquia Series: Empathy is a choice - The limits of empathy are more apparent than real

When: Mar 16, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

Empathy, or the ability to feel what others feel, is often seen as a powerful moral force. But what are its limits? Many studies find that empathy is less sensitive to large-scale suffering (e.g., natural disasters, genocides) and the suffering of racial and political out-groups. These empathy deficits have led some scholars to argue against empathy, concluding that it is an unreliable basis for moral action. In this talk, he suggest that limits on empathy are more apparent than real: what appear to be built-in “glitches" in empathy may instead be due to motivated choices we make to avoid empathy’s costs. He will present a motivational framework for understanding empathy, and will discuss evidence that seemingly fixed limits on empathy can shift depending on what we want, and choose, to feel. If empathy limits are flexible choices rather than fixed constraints, this challenges strong normative arguments against the usefulness of empathy in everyday life. He will conclude by discussing implications for ethical debates about empathy and future directions in research on empathy as a choice. Rock Colloquia Series: Empathy is a choice - The limits of empathy are more apparent than real - Read More…

Job Talk - Stripped to the Bone: Sequencing Queerness in the Comic Strip Work of Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz

When: Feb 16, 2017 at 9:30 AM
Where: 216 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802

In this talk, I develop a queer theory of comics strip form by exploring the comics work of mixed-media artists Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz. Both New York residents of lower Manhattan at key moments in the development of contemporary U.S. queer culture—gay liberation and the AIDS crisis respectively—Brainard and Wojnarowicz showed artistic affinity with the comics medium throughout their short-lived but prodigious careers in the 1970s and 1980s. In the early 1970s, Brainard adopted the classic comic strip character Nancy in a series of paper works that functioned as enlarged comic strips; in these panels, Brainard depicted Nancy in a variety of radical sexual and social positions (as transgendered, high on drugs, performing in a pornographic movie, and much more) that allowed viewers to imagine a traditionally American icon as a potentially queer one inhabiting multiple, non-synchronous identities. Little more than a decade later, in David Wojnarowicz’s graphic memoir, 7 Miles a Second (1988-1993), the artist and his collaborators James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook, used the visual disjoint between comic strip panels to formally dramatize the experience of social alienation and physical pain associated with being a queer person with AIDS. Through a historically situated close reading of these two works, I show how Brainard and Wojnarowicz each deployed the formal codes of the comics medium to articulate emergent affective orientations towards transformations in alternative sexual cultures; consequently, I argue for an understanding of comic strip sequence as a formal expressions of modern queer sexuality as an unpredictable unfolding of countless erotic possibilities. Job Talk - Stripped to the Bone: Sequencing Queerness in the Comic Strip Work of Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz - Read More…

Rock Colloquia Series: The Ethics of Yoga - Walt Whitman’s Spiritual Democracy

When: Feb 02, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

The yoga world has been rocked by a number of scandals in recent years. It seems that many teachers of yoga have not heeded the basic ethical guidelines found in Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, especially the imperative to practice ahimsa, non-harming of others. One might be excused in wondering if yoga has any ethics at all. I believe that yoga can represent an important contribution to contemporary conversations about ethics. Rock Colloquia Series: The Ethics of Yoga - Walt Whitman’s Spiritual Democracy - Read More…

Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions

When: Dec 09, 2016 at 8:00 AM
Where: Virtual and Room 116, Bio Behavioral Health Building

The purpose of this symposium is to gain a collective, interdisciplinary, and international understanding of the issues surrounding food ethics in the foodservice environment. Ethics of foodservice relates to the human conduct along the supply chain of production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. Food away from home (FAFH), particularly in the foodservice environment, is an increasing proportion of our food consumption and expenditure. The complexity of this system, and the significance of the FAFH activity in our lives makes this an important discussion. Panelist will present this specific point of view, followed by a brief discussion. We hope you will be able to join us and contribute to this discussion. Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions - Read More…

Rock Colloquia Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World

When: Nov 17, 2016 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

There is a widespread assumption that the American food system after World War II was transformed—toward an increasingly industrialized production of crops, more processed foods, and diets higher in fat, sugar, and calories—as part of a unified system. In this talk, Bryan McDonald brings together the history of food, agriculture, and foreign policy to explore how food was deployed in the first decades of the Cold War to promote American national security and national interests, a concept referred to as food power. Rock Colloquia Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World - Read More…

Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability

When: Nov 03, 2016 at 1:00 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

This paper sketches four archetypal characterizations of how food will be produced, processed, distributed and consumed over the coming half century—a time in which all manner of social association will be influenced by climate change, growing scarcity of resources relative to human population and climate change. The archetypes are offered as scenarios that facilitate advance thinking at the level of total food systems, and are not represented as exhausting all the forces and possible adaptations that are relevant. They are intended to provoke a critical attitude toward certain presumptions that may be widely shared, especially among advocates of alternative food systems. The analysis places special emphasis on how each scenario reflects and incorporates a response to environmental sustainability and to food justice. Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability - Read More…

Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect

When: Oct 05, 2016 at 5:00 PM
Where: Lewis Katz Auditorium

After the fiasco of the Iraq War of 2003, the West pushed for a new mandate through the UN called the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in 2005. This new mandate revived ideas of humanitarian intervention that had been called into question from the detritus of Iraq. No lessons were learned. After R2P came Libya, a society now in ruins, and then came Syria, a country whose civil war had been fanned along even as no good outcome seemed on the horizon. This talk will explore the landscape of intervention and its perils. Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect - Read More…