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Ethics Education

by admin Nov 20, 2014

Job Talk - Just Borders: Place-Specific Duties and the Rights of Immigrants

When: Jan 27, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802

Does physical presence in a territory confer social and political rights on all those present? Recently, many scholars have argued that legal citizenship cannot be the sole source of rights, and hence they have advocated for place-specific rights for immigrants. These scholars often stress immigrants’ ties to a political community. But, if ties to the political community are the main criterion for rights, then it seems that place and territory do no real work in the argument. In this presentation, I propose that we take place seriously, rather than just treating it as a dummy concept that has membership do the real argumentative work. The talk shows that there are place-specific duties, a special type of duty indexed to place. These duties comprise a level of morality that layfolk intuitively recognize, but theorists routinely overlook. The talk then shows that these place-specific duties cannot be properly fulfilled by citizens unless they grant non-citizens who are present in the locality rights to stay, and also grant them rights to participate in the jurisdiction’s political organization. The talk will conclude by discussing how the thesis of place-specific duties has important implications for theories of immigrants’ rights, normative theories of resource management and environmental stewardship, and theories of territorial jurisdiction and of the justification of the modern state’s territorial boundaries. Job Talk - Just Borders: Place-Specific Duties and the Rights of Immigrants - Read More…

Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place

When: Jan 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802

Most of the debate about justice in immigration focuses on the dual challenge of mobility and membership, and most contributors to this debate favor more-open borders on either ideal-theoretic grounds such as free movement, or non-ideal theory grounds such as rectificatory justice. The current paper, however, argues that our position on justice in migration should foreground the voices of social movements of dispossessed, landless, and migrant persons. These movements do not tend to prioritize open borders. Instead, they prioritize what can best be characterized as a “right to place.” Building upon the discourses of these social movements, the paper develops the idea of a right to place and argues that theories of justice in migration should prioritize that over any particular border regime. The paper then argues for a ‘movement-led’ methodology, defending this method as against both ideal and non-ideal theory. Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place - Read More…

Co-Sponsored Event - The Stuff of Fiction: The Rise of the Environmental Novel

When: Dec 05, 2016 at 12:15 PM
Where: 102 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802

Stephanie Foote is the author of Regional Fictions: Culture and Identity in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (2001), The Parvenu’s Plot: Gender, Culture, and Class in the Age of Realism (2014), the editor, with Elizabeth Mazzolini, of Histories of the Dustheap: Waste, Material Cultures, Social Justice (2012), and the editor of reprints of two of Ann Aldrich’s 1950s lesbian pulp classics We Walk Alone and We, Too, Must Love (2006). With Stephanie LeMenager, she is the founder and editor of Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities. Her articles have appeared in numerous edited collections and in such journals as American Literature, American Literary History, Signs, The Henry James Review, College Literature, Pedagogy, J19, and PMLA. She is currently working on The Art of Things, a project about waste and literature. Co-Sponsored Event - The Stuff of Fiction: The Rise of the Environmental Novel - Read More…

Lecture & Panel Discussion: Privacy, Identity, and Online Literacy: A Three-Pronged Approach

When: Nov 11, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Where: Krause Innovation Studio, Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802

In the United States, the dominant legal and regulatory paradigm for thinking about information privacy centers on a form of individual self-advocacy, which legal scholar Daniel Solve calls “privacy self-management.” On this model—which aims to be maximally permissive toward the public and private organizations that collect information about us, in order not to impede choice and innovation—individuals are supposed to be given the opportunity to make rationally informed decisions about how the information they give over about themselves is collected, analyzed, and used. Relatively little is said, however, about what individuals must know or know how to do in order to make those decisions. In this lecture, Dr. Daniel Susser will argue that there are, in fact, three different kinds of technology literacy which individuals faced with such decisions require: computer literacy, media or information literacy, and privacy literacy. Computer literacy is a kind of background knowledge about how information technology works, the infrastructures which support it, and the basic skills required in order to effectively use computers. Media literacy involves knowing how to find, access, interpret, and convey information online. And privacy literacy has to do with recognizing when, why, and how information about oneself is at risk. He will describe what each kind of literacy entails and what distinguishes each from the others, and will also explain why all three are necessary prerequisites for individuals to safeguard their privacy online. Lecture & Panel Discussion: Privacy, Identity, and Online Literacy: A Three-Pronged Approach - Read More…

A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy

When: Nov 10, 2016 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Daniel Susser, assistant professor of philosophy at San Jose State University, will discuss ethical and political interventions in distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable uses of information that is collected about each of us. A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy - Read More…

Film Screening: "Tower"

When: Nov 01, 2016 at 4:30 PM
Where: Flex Theater, HUB-Robeson Center

“TOWER,” an innovative documentary about the 1966 University of Texas Tower shootings, will screen at 7 p.m. on Nov. 1 and 2 in the FLEX Theatre at the HUB-Robeson Center -- less than three weeks after the film opens nationally in theaters. A panel discussion, including audience questions, will follow the Nov. 1 screening. Film Screening: "Tower" - Read More…

From Abode to Dissemination

When: Oct 28, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

A keynote presentation within the "Idioms of Ethical Life: A Conference in Honor of the Work of Dr. Dennis J. Schmidt" that will be presented by John Sallis. This polyphony is intoned around the original word for what came to be called ethics. This opening is sounded within the various texts that constitute its ambience. Return to this ambience is proposed as a requisite prelude to a renewal of originary ethics. From Abode to Dissemination - Read More…

Co-sponsored Event: 4th Annual Rural Studies Student Conference - Reconceptualizing Rural Contexts

When: from Oct 28, 2016 9:00 AM to Oct 29, 2016 5:00 PM

This is open to graduate and undergraduate students from all disciplines and all institutions who study rural areas. New this year is workshopping sessions for those hoping to get feedback on unfinished or ongoing work. There will also be two keynote speakers! Registration is now open! This year, registration is FREE for all attendees, but still REQUIRED. Registration will close on September 30, 2016. Co-sponsored Event: 4th Annual Rural Studies Student Conference - Reconceptualizing Rural Contexts - Read More…

Idioms of Ethical Life: A Conference in Honor of the Work of Dr. Dennis J. Schmidt

When: from Oct 28, 2016 8:00 AM to Oct 29, 2016 5:00 PM
Where: 111 Pasquerilla Spiritual Center - Eisenhower Chapel University Park, PA 16802

The Idioms of Ethical Life is an invitation to think with the work of philosopher, Dennis Schmidt. Schmidt has argued that the transformative character of thinking that constitutes the ethical is a matter of the idiom, that is, it is worked out in the singularity of situations. For Schmidt, ethics belongs to the very nature of thinking, properly understood. Dennis Schmidt, who was actively involved in the Rock Ethics Institute, is now Professor of Philosophy at Western Sydney University. This conference brings together some of the leading philosophers in the area of continental philosophy to reflect on the importance of his contributions to the profession. Idioms of Ethical Life: A Conference in Honor of the Work of Dr. Dennis J. Schmidt - Read More…

Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect

When: Oct 05, 2016 at 5:00 PM
Where: Lewis Katz Auditorium

After the fiasco of the Iraq War of 2003, the West pushed for a new mandate through the UN called the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in 2005. This new mandate revived ideas of humanitarian intervention that had been called into question from the detritus of Iraq. No lessons were learned. After R2P came Libya, a society now in ruins, and then came Syria, a country whose civil war had been fanned along even as no good outcome seemed on the horizon. This talk will explore the landscape of intervention and its perils. Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect - Read More…