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All Previous Events

by admin Feb 13, 2015

Co-Sponsored Event - Coffee Hour with Derek Alderman: MLK Streets as Unfinished Civil Rights Work: The Need for Counter-Storytelling in a Trump America

When: Jan 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 319 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802

Over the past twenty years or so, I have researched the politics of naming America’s streets for Martin Luther King, Jr (MLK). These roadways, which represent the most widespread and contentious memorials to King, have proven to be important sites for understanding the politics that continue to surround the civil rights leader’s reputation and legacy. Co-Sponsored Event - Coffee Hour with Derek Alderman: MLK Streets as Unfinished Civil Rights Work: The Need for Counter-Storytelling in a Trump America - Read More…

Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place

When: Jan 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM
Where: 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802

Most of the debate about justice in immigration focuses on the dual challenge of mobility and membership, and most contributors to this debate favor more-open borders on either ideal-theoretic grounds such as free movement, or non-ideal theory grounds such as rectificatory justice. The current paper, however, argues that our position on justice in migration should foreground the voices of social movements of dispossessed, landless, and migrant persons. These movements do not tend to prioritize open borders. Instead, they prioritize what can best be characterized as a “right to place.” Building upon the discourses of these social movements, the paper develops the idea of a right to place and argues that theories of justice in migration should prioritize that over any particular border regime. The paper then argues for a ‘movement-led’ methodology, defending this method as against both ideal and non-ideal theory. Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place - Read More…

Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions

When: Dec 09, 2016 at 8:00 AM
Where: Virtual and Room 116, Bio Behavioral Health Building

The purpose of this symposium is to gain a collective, interdisciplinary, and international understanding of the issues surrounding food ethics in the foodservice environment. Ethics of foodservice relates to the human conduct along the supply chain of production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. Food away from home (FAFH), particularly in the foodservice environment, is an increasing proportion of our food consumption and expenditure. The complexity of this system, and the significance of the FAFH activity in our lives makes this an important discussion. Panelist will present this specific point of view, followed by a brief discussion. We hope you will be able to join us and contribute to this discussion. Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions - Read More…

Co-Sponsored Event - The Stuff of Fiction: The Rise of the Environmental Novel

When: Dec 05, 2016 at 12:15 PM
Where: 102 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802

Stephanie Foote is the author of Regional Fictions: Culture and Identity in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (2001), The Parvenu’s Plot: Gender, Culture, and Class in the Age of Realism (2014), the editor, with Elizabeth Mazzolini, of Histories of the Dustheap: Waste, Material Cultures, Social Justice (2012), and the editor of reprints of two of Ann Aldrich’s 1950s lesbian pulp classics We Walk Alone and We, Too, Must Love (2006). With Stephanie LeMenager, she is the founder and editor of Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities. Her articles have appeared in numerous edited collections and in such journals as American Literature, American Literary History, Signs, The Henry James Review, College Literature, Pedagogy, J19, and PMLA. She is currently working on The Art of Things, a project about waste and literature. Co-Sponsored Event - The Stuff of Fiction: The Rise of the Environmental Novel - Read More…

Film Screening & Panel Discussion: After Coal

When: Nov 29, 2016 at 7:30 PM
Where: State Theatre, 130 West College Avenue State College, PA 16801

What happens when the fossil fuels run out? How do communities and cultures survive? Film Screening & Panel Discussion: After Coal - Read More…

Brownbag Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World

When: Nov 17, 2016 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

There is a widespread assumption that the American food system after World War II was transformed—toward an increasingly industrialized production of crops, more processed foods, and diets higher in fat, sugar, and calories—as part of a unified system. In this talk, Bryan McDonald brings together the history of food, agriculture, and foreign policy to explore how food was deployed in the first decades of the Cold War to promote American national security and national interests, a concept referred to as food power. Brownbag Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World - Read More…

Lecture & Panel Discussion: Privacy, Identity, and Online Literacy: A Three-Pronged Approach

When: Nov 11, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Where: Krause Innovation Studio, Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802

In the United States, the dominant legal and regulatory paradigm for thinking about information privacy centers on a form of individual self-advocacy, which legal scholar Daniel Solve calls “privacy self-management.” On this model—which aims to be maximally permissive toward the public and private organizations that collect information about us, in order not to impede choice and innovation—individuals are supposed to be given the opportunity to make rationally informed decisions about how the information they give over about themselves is collected, analyzed, and used. Relatively little is said, however, about what individuals must know or know how to do in order to make those decisions. In this lecture, Dr. Daniel Susser will argue that there are, in fact, three different kinds of technology literacy which individuals faced with such decisions require: computer literacy, media or information literacy, and privacy literacy. Computer literacy is a kind of background knowledge about how information technology works, the infrastructures which support it, and the basic skills required in order to effectively use computers. Media literacy involves knowing how to find, access, interpret, and convey information online. And privacy literacy has to do with recognizing when, why, and how information about oneself is at risk. He will describe what each kind of literacy entails and what distinguishes each from the others, and will also explain why all three are necessary prerequisites for individuals to safeguard their privacy online. Lecture & Panel Discussion: Privacy, Identity, and Online Literacy: A Three-Pronged Approach - Read More…

24th Annual Critical Theory Roundtable

When: from Nov 11, 2016 9:00 AM to Nov 13, 2016 5:00 AM
Where: Oak Building, University Park, PA 16802

The keynote lecture, "Critique and Disappointment" will take place on Friday, November 11. The Saturday sessions will take place form 9 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. and the Sunday sessions from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is free, but required as you are free to attend a subset of the Roundtable. Please register at https://pennstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2aSskoJoUd0WzdP 24th Annual Critical Theory Roundtable - Read More…

A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy

When: Nov 10, 2016 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Daniel Susser, assistant professor of philosophy at San Jose State University, will discuss ethical and political interventions in distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable uses of information that is collected about each of us. A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy - Read More…

Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability

When: Nov 03, 2016 at 1:00 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

This paper sketches four archetypal characterizations of how food will be produced, processed, distributed and consumed over the coming half century—a time in which all manner of social association will be influenced by climate change, growing scarcity of resources relative to human population and climate change. The archetypes are offered as scenarios that facilitate advance thinking at the level of total food systems, and are not represented as exhausting all the forces and possible adaptations that are relevant. They are intended to provoke a critical attitude toward certain presumptions that may be widely shared, especially among advocates of alternative food systems. The analysis places special emphasis on how each scenario reflects and incorporates a response to environmental sustainability and to food justice. Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability - Read More…