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All Previous Events

by admin Feb 13, 2015

Identities as Embodied Horizons

When: Aug 04, 2003 at 3:00 PM
Where: 108 Wartik Building

Co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and presented by Linda Martín Alcoff, Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University. Identities as Embodied Horizons - Read More…

Thinking Desire: Taking Perspectives Seriously

When: Jul 28, 2003 at 3:00 PM
Where: 108 Wartik Building

Charlene Haddock Seigfried is a Professor of Philosophy and American Studies and a member of the Women’s Studies committee at Purdue University. She is past president of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, was the John Dewey Lecturer for 1998, and is currently vice-president of the William James Society and a member of the executive board of the Society for the Study of Women Philosophers and the APA Committee on the Status of Women. Among her publications are Pragmatism and Feminism,William James’s Radical Reconstruction of Philosophy, and Chaos and Context, and she edited Feminist Interpretations of John Dewey and a special issue on feminism and pragmatism in Hypatia. In her recent work on Jane Addams, including introductions toDemocracy and Social Ethics and The Long Road of Woman’s Memory, she develops Addams’ theory of knowledge as a cooperative social inquiry responsive to power disparities. Thinking Desire: Taking Perspectives Seriously - Read More…

Responsible Science

When: from Jul 21, 2003 4:00 PM to Jul 21, 2004 5:00 PM
Where: 108 Wartik

Lynn Hankinson Nelson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Washington where she teaches courses in the history and philosophy of science, and in feminist philosophy. She is the author of Who Knows: From Quine to Feminist Empiricism (Temple 1990) and co-author with Jack Nelson of On Quine (Wadsworth 2001). She has edited a special issue of Synthese (1995) devoted to Feminism and Science and is co-editor with Alison Wylie of a special issue of Hypatia devoted to Feminist Science Studies (Jan. 2004). She is co-editor with Jack Nelson of Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science (Kluwer 1996) and Feminist Interpretations of W.V. Quine (Penn State 2003). She and Jack enjoy sailing on Puget Sound. Responsible Science - Read More…

Knowing Ecologically: Remapping the Epistemic Terrain

When: Jul 14, 2003 at 3:00 PM
Where: 108 Wartik Building

Lorraine Code is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Graduate Programs in Social and Political Thought, and Women's Studies, at York University in Toronto. Her research interests are in epistemology, feminist philosophy, and the politics of knowledge. Author of numerous articles in feminist theory, her book publications include Epistemic Responsibility; What Can She Know? Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge; and Rhetorical Spaces: Essays on (Gendered) Locations. Currently holder of a Killam Research Fellowship from the Canada Council, she is writing a new book with the working title, Ecological Imaginings, Responsible Knowings, and the Politics of Epistemic Location. Knowing Ecologically: Remapping the Epistemic Terrain - Read More…

Human Molecular Genetics and the Subject of Race: Contrasting the Rhetoric with the Practices in Law and Medicine

When: Apr 16, 2003 at 10:00 AM

This Breaking the Silence Lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for Human Development and Family Research in Diverse Contexts presented by Troy Duster, Professor, Institute for the History of Production of Knowledge and Department of Sociology, New York University. Human Molecular Genetics and the Subject of Race: Contrasting the Rhetoric with the Practices in Law and Medicine - Read More…

Meditating on Disability

When: Mar 31, 2003 at 10:00 PM

About Faces and Disability

When: Mar 24, 2003 at 6:00 PM

From Racism to Race and Back: The Strange Career of a Historical Crime

When: Mar 20, 2003 at 10:00 AM

This Breaking the Silence Lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of History presented by Barbara J. Fields, Professor of History, Columbia University. From Racism to Race and Back: The Strange Career of a Historical Crime - Read More…

Stolen Bodies, Reclaimed Bodies

When: Mar 04, 2003 at 6:00 PM

Eli Clare, a poet, essayist, activist, and an avid hiker living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, has been published widely under her given name, Elizabeth Clare. Born in Port Orford, OR, she grew up cutting firewood in the Siskiyou National Forest; now a writer in Ann Arbor and en route to Vermont, she captures and translates her experiences into narratives that reverberate with pride, disability, transgender celebration, queer crossings, class struggles, raced living, and, above all, a constant sense of place despite her mountain, community, and globe-trotting feet. Stolen Bodies, Reclaimed Bodies - Read More…