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Home > Events > Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place

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Job Talk - Migration, Social Movements, and the Right to Place

Most of the debate about justice in immigration focuses on the dual challenge of mobility and membership, and most contributors to this debate favor more-open borders on either ideal-theoretic grounds such as free movement, or non-ideal theory grounds such as rectificatory justice. The current paper, however, argues that our position on justice in migration should foreground the voices of social movements of dispossessed, landless, and migrant persons. These movements do not tend to prioritize open borders. Instead, they prioritize what can best be characterized as a “right to place.” Building upon the discourses of these social movements, the paper develops the idea of a right to place and argues that theories of justice in migration should prioritize that over any particular border regime. The paper then argues for a ‘movement-led’ methodology, defending this method as against both ideal and non-ideal theory.
by Rob Peeler Jan 09, 2017
When Jan 20, 2017
from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Where 401 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802
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Speaker

Avery Kolers HeadshotAvery Kolers, University of Louisville

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Abstract

Most of the debate about justice in immigration focuses on the dual challenge of mobility and membership, and most contributors to this debate favor more-open borders on either ideal-theoretic grounds such as free movement, or non-ideal theory grounds such as rectificatory justice. The current paper, however, argues that our position on justice in migration should foreground the voices of social movements of dispossessed, landless, and migrant persons. These movements do not tend to prioritize open borders. Instead, they prioritize what can best be characterized as a “right to place.” Building upon the discourses of these social movements, the paper develops the idea of a right to place and argues that theories of justice in migration should prioritize that over any particular border regime. The paper then argues for a ‘movement-led’ methodology, defending this method as against both ideal and non-ideal theory.