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Home > Events > Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition

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Job Talk - Side Affects: Transnormativity, Eurocentricity, and the Necropolitics of Gender Transition

Are the medical protocols of gender transition grounded in Eurocentric conceptions of gender? This talk delves into the archive of Western medical sexology, examining the absence, misrecognition, and active erasure of queer and non-white subjects. Positioning this archive in relation to the modern/colonial gender system (Lugones 2007, 2010), Malatino explores how transnationally hegemonic models of gender transition are grounded in deeply partial, highly normative understandings of embodiment that produce several kinds of structural violence: the de-authorization of intersex and trans subjects as experts on their own experience, the necropolitical gatekeeping methods that stratify health care access and intensify the vulnerability of non-transnormative subjects, and the inadequate monitoring and systematic under-research of the health impacts that effect folks imbricated in networks of medicalized transition. How might we understand transition beyond Eurocentric medical logics? How might this re-cognition ameliorate certain forms of structural violence?
by Rob Peeler Feb 03, 2017
When Feb 28, 2017
from 9:30 AM to 10:30 AM
Where 216 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802
Contact Name
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Speaker

Hilary Malatino 

Abstract

Are the medical protocols of gender transition grounded in Eurocentric conceptions of gender? This talk delves into the archive of Western medical sexology, examining the absence, misrecognition, and active erasure of queer and non-white subjects. Positioning this archive in relation to the modern/colonial gender system (Lugones 2007, 2010), Malatino explores how transnationally hegemonic models of gender transition are grounded in deeply partial, highly normative understandings of embodiment that produce several kinds of structural violence: the de-authorization of intersex and trans subjects as experts on their own experience, the necropolitical gatekeeping methods that stratify health care access and intensify the vulnerability of non-transnormative subjects, and the inadequate monitoring and systematic under-research of the health impacts that effect folks imbricated in networks of medicalized transition. How might we understand transition beyond Eurocentric medical logics? How might this re-cognition ameliorate certain forms of structural violence?