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Lecture & Panel Discussion: Privacy, Identity, and Online Literacy: A Three-Pronged Approach

In the United States, the dominant legal and regulatory paradigm for thinking about information privacy centers on a form of individual self-advocacy, which legal scholar Daniel Solve calls “privacy self-management.” On this model—which aims to be maximally permissive toward the public and private organizations that collect information about us, in order not to impede choice and innovation—individuals are supposed to be given the opportunity to make rationally informed decisions about how the information they give over about themselves is collected, analyzed, and used. Relatively little is said, however, about what individuals must know or know how to do in order to make those decisions. In this lecture, Dr. Daniel Susser will argue that there are, in fact, three different kinds of technology literacy which individuals faced with such decisions require: computer literacy, media or information literacy, and privacy literacy. Computer literacy is a kind of background knowledge about how information technology works, the infrastructures which support it, and the basic skills required in order to effectively use computers. Media literacy involves knowing how to find, access, interpret, and convey information online. And privacy literacy has to do with recognizing when, why, and how information about oneself is at risk. He will describe what each kind of literacy entails and what distinguishes each from the others, and will also explain why all three are necessary prerequisites for individuals to safeguard their privacy online.
When Nov 11, 2016
from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Where Krause Innovation Studio, Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802
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About the Lecture

In the United States, the dominant legal and regulatory paradigm for thinking about information privacy centers on a form of individual self-advocacy, which legal scholar Daniel Solve calls “privacy self-management.” On this model—which aims to be maximally permissive toward the public and private organizations that collect information about us, in order not to impede choice and innovation—individuals are supposed to be given the opportunity to make rationally informed decisions about how the information they give over about themselves is collected, analyzed, and used. Relatively little is said, however, about what individuals must know or know how to do in order to make those decisions. In this lecture, Dr. Daniel Susser will argue that there are, in fact, three different kinds of technology literacy which individuals faced with such decisions require: computer literacy, media or information literacy, and privacy literacy. Computer literacy is a kind of background knowledge about how information technology works, the infrastructures which support it, and the basic skills required in order to effectively use computers. Media literacy involves knowing how to find, access, interpret, and convey information online. And privacy literacy has to do with recognizing when, why, and how information about oneself is at risk. He will describe what each kind of literacy entails and what distinguishes each from the others, and will also explain why all three are necessary prerequisites for individuals to safeguard their privacy online. 

Panelists

Daniel Susser Daniel Susser is an assistant professor of Philosophy at San Jose State University. In 2015-16 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Information Law Institute at New York University’s School of Law, a member of the Institute's Privacy Research Group, and a visiting scholar in NYU's Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. He works in philosophy of technology and science and technology studies, with an emphasis on normative issues in technology. His recent work has focused on privacy, big data, and online identity. 
Marcela Borge Marcela Borge is assistant professor of Learning and Performance Systems in the College of Education. Dr. Borge’s research interests are at the intersection of learning, cognition, and design. Her current research focuses on unpacking group cognition and student needs in order to design new models of interaction and technological tools to enhance learning. 
Chris Millet Chris Millet is the director of Learning Design Operations for Penn State’s World Campus. In this role he is responsible for overseeing the design and development of online courses in a broad variety of disciplines across the university. He has over 15 years of experience in online learning and emerging educational technologies, with a particular interest digital media, learning spaces, learning analytics, mobile technologies, and immersive learning environments. Chris earned a Masters of Education in Instructional Systems, and is currently pursuing a PhD in Learning, Design, and Technology.
Phil Tietjen Phil Tietjen received a PhD in Learning, Design and Technology from the College of Education at Penn State. His primary research interests include collaborative learning and group cognition in online environments, informal learning, qualitative research methods of online spaces and e-learning pedagogy.