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Lecture Series Events

The Richard B. Lippin Lecture Series: A lecture with Dr. Carolyn Hildebrandt, Professor, Department of Psychology at the University of Northern Iowa

When: Apr 20, 2017 at 3:00 PM
Where: 111 Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, University Park, PA 16802

A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy

When: Nov 10, 2016 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Daniel Susser, assistant professor of philosophy at San Jose State University, will discuss ethical and political interventions in distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable uses of information that is collected about each of us. A Harold K. Schilling Memorial Lecture: Big Data, Ethics, and Philosophy - Read More…

A Schilling Memorial Lecture - Natural Freedom: Human/Nature Nondualism in Japanese Thought

When: Apr 01, 2016 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Westernized policies and practices in Japan have contributed more to the exacerbation than to the amelioration of environmental destruction, the nondualistic conception of the relation between humans and nature that can be found in much of traditional Japanese thought and in some modern Japanese philosophies may well help us rethink the dualistic presuppositions and false dichotomies that lie at the ideological roots of our ecological problems. We need to learn to think of and experience the world, not in terms of humans versus nature, nor even just in terms of humans in cooperation with nature, but rather in terms of humans in nature, humans as part of nature, humans as participating in nature. And this entails, I mean to show in this exploration of Japanese thought, a rethinking of nature, of naturalness, of humanity, and of freedom. A Schilling Memorial Lecture - Natural Freedom: Human/Nature Nondualism in Japanese Thought - Read More…

Food System Fragility and Resilience in the Aftermath of Disruption and Controversy

When: Oct 22, 2015 at 4:10 PM
Where: 252 Ericsson Food Science Building, University Park, PA 16802

What happens when everyday understandings about food are disrupted? In order to answer this question, I conducted 6 focus groups and follow up-interviews with urban meat consumers. Findings suggest that disruption occurs if/when consumers find certain meat products to be potentially dangerous, disgusting, or unethical. When these core disruptive elements overlap with one another in the context of a single issue or event, the impact on consumers can be even more pronounced (as was the case with the “pink slime” controversy). In most instances, however, these disruptions tend to be fairly short-lived, particularly if they fail to engage consumers on an ethical level. Food System Fragility and Resilience in the Aftermath of Disruption and Controversy - Read More…

2015 Moral Literacy Colloquium

When: Apr 24, 2015 at 6:30 PM
Where: Nittany Lion Inn / Rackley Building

The 2015 Moral Literacy Colloquium will tap into the collective experience of participants to explore how they understand and practice ethics education in diverse contexts. This will include discussions of best practices, theory development, social and professional issues in moral literacy education, international and cross-cultural approaches to moral literacy education, and proposals for future initiatives relating to ethics education, research, and practice. 2015 Moral Literacy Colloquium - Read More…

After Lipman: A Developmental K-6 Ethics Curriculum

When: Apr 24, 2015 at 6:30 PM
Where: Nittany Lion Inn

Part of the Lippin Lecture Series and the 2015 Moral Literacy Colloquium. After Lipman: A Developmental K-6 Ethics Curriculum - Read More…

A Game-based Experiential Approach to Teaching Professional Ethics

A Game-based Experiential Approach to Teaching Professional Ethics

When: Apr 06, 2015 at 5:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library,

Does this increase student engagement? Join us when Dr. Thomas P Seager visits Penn State and explains his innovative experimental approach to teaching professional ethics. A Game-based Experiential Approach to Teaching Professional Ethics - Read More…

Nice is Not Enough: Providing the Foundation for Lifelong Moral Development

When: Mar 18, 2015 at 3:30 PM
Where: 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Presented by Dr. Larry Nucci, Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley Nice is Not Enough: Providing the Foundation for Lifelong Moral Development - Read More…

Masking the Meaningful

When: Mar 04, 2015 at 12:00 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Why do citizens of the societies we count as democracies fail to react to catastrophic threats? Because those societies aren’t genuine democracies. Electoral choices fail to correspond to the voters’ interests, and citizens cannot identify what is of most concern to them. Climate change is a striking example of this phenomenon. Professor Philip Kitcher, a leading voice in science and ethics issues, will discuss the relationships between the practices of science and of democracy that develop at these conflicting intersections. Kitcher’s talk, part of the Research Ethics Lecture Series, will engage the campus community in a broad discussion about the roles and responsibilities of those of us who are both scientists and citizens. Masking the Meaningful - Read More…

Should we mandate vaccination for your doctor, you and your children?

When: Nov 10, 2014 at 12:00 PM
Where: 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802