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Philosophy, Subjectivity and Racial Identity: The Janus-Face of Philosophy

Jacqueline Scott is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University of Chicago. She is the co-editor along with Todd Franklin ofCritical Affinities: Nietzsche and African American Thought (SUNY 2006). She has published several articles on Nietzsche and Critical Race Theory and she is currently working on a manuscript entitled, Nietzsche’s Worthy Opponents: Socrates, Wagner, the Ascetic Priest and Women. Additionally she serves as a subject editor for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
When Jul 31, 2013
from 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM
Where 111 Chambers Building
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Jacqueline Scott is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University of Chicago. She is the co-editor along with Todd Franklin ofCritical Affinities: Nietzsche and African American Thought (SUNY 2006). She has published several articles on Nietzsche and Critical Race Theory and she is currently working on a manuscript entitled, Nietzsche’s Worthy Opponents: Socrates, Wagner, the Ascetic Priest and Women. Additionally she serves as a subject editor for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.]

Philosophy, Subjectivity and Racial Identity: The Janus-Face of Philosophy

I aim to attempt to re-think our contemporary conceptions of race and racialized identities. As opposed to getting rid of race altogether, I argue that we should to try to reconceive of our conceptions of race in order to allow for racial identities that might actually contribute to the health of individuals and societies. In short, theory must be informed by as well as joined to, practice. I explore the ways in which philosophy might contribute to this project. Some have argued philosophical conceptions of subjectivity, at least in part, are responsible for the theoretical underpinnings of our contemporary notions of race. I question whether this approach actually aids in creating meaningful lives for some people—particularly in the creation of healthy and meaningful lives for many people of color. I argue that I also see ways in which philosophy has contributed, and can better contribute, to this project of the re-conceptions of healthy subjectivity and race. In this sense, philosophy, can serve as the location for a remarkable turning point in the academic study of race.


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