The Rock Ethics Institute

Home > Events > Slavery's Expansion in the Age of Emancipation: West Africa and the U.S. in the 19th Century

Events

Slavery's Expansion in the Age of Emancipation: West Africa and the U.S. in the 19th Century

Patrick Manning is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History at the University of Pittsburgh. A leading scholar of world history and African history, his current research addresses global historiography, early human history, migration in world history, the African diaspora, and the demography of African slavery. His recent books include Migration in World History (2004) and Navigating World History (2003). He is presently at work on The African Diaspora: A History through Culture.
When Feb 23, 2007
from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

PATRICK MANNING

 

Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History, University of Pittsburgh

Patrick Manning is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History at the University of Pittsburgh. A leading scholar of world history and African history, his current research addresses global historiography, early human history, migration in world history, the African diaspora, and the demography of African slavery. His recent books include Migration in World History (2004) and Navigating World History (2003). He is presently at work on The African Diaspora: A History through Culture.

Slavery's Expansion in the Age of Emancipation: West Africa and the U.S. in the 19th Century

Despite the twin death knells dealt to slavery by the Haitian Revolution of 1791 and British abolition of the slave trade in 1807, the “peculiar institution” grew geographically, demographically, and economically before it collapsed. This lecture compares the expansion of slavery in the American South (to 1860) and in West Africa (to the 1880s), tracing their parallels and contrasts in economy, population, and society. These two systems are often contrasted in terms of domestic slavery and abolition by colonial powers in West Africa and plantation slavery destroyed by civil war in the United States. Yet both slave systems were inextricably tied to the world economy, and both systems were ended by a mix of slave protest and military conquest.