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Slaves' Claims to Family and Property in the Southern Gold Coast and the U.S. South

Dylan Penningroth is associate professor of history at Northwestern University. He works on African American history, with special interests in the history of slavery and emancipation, property and family, and African History. He is the recipient of the Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians in 2000 as well as the Organization of American Historians' 2004 Avery O. Craven Award for his book, The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South (University of North Carolina Press, 2003). He has been appointed an OAH Distinguished Lecturer 2005-2008 and is currently working on a book about African Americans' engagement with law in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century South.
When Oct 06, 2006
from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Where 302 Pond Laboratory
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DYLAN PENNINGROTH

 

Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University

Dylan Penningroth is associate professor of history at Northwestern University. He works on African American history, with special interests in the history of slavery and emancipation, property and family, and African History. He is the recipient of the Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians in 2000 as well as the Organization of American Historians' 2004 Avery O. Craven Award for his book, The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South (University of North Carolina Press, 2003). He has been appointed an OAH Distinguished Lecturer 2005-2008 and is currently working on a book about African Americans' engagement with law in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century South.

Slaves' Claims to Family and Property in the Southern Gold Coast and the U.S. South

Although scholars had long thought kinlessness a definitive feature of slavery, recent work has uncovered a much more complex history of kinship and slavery. In West Africa, slaveholders gradually incorporated slaves and their descendants into slaveholders' kin groups, and slaves gained status and prerogatives appropriate to their kin, including the ownership of property. American slaves formed extensive families, produced their own goods, traded, and bequeathed them. Professor Penningroth's lecture will compare modes of kinship and property holding among slaves in West Africa and the United States.