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The Future of Bioethics: From the Microscope to the Macroscopic

Jonathan H. Marks is Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities, and Law at The Pennsylvania State University; Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute; and Director of the Bioethics Program. He is currently a non-residential fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. He leads a collaborative research project that is jointly funded by the Rock Ethics Institute and the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics (through its Lab on Institutional Corruption), exploring the ethical and policy implications of industry sponsorship of health-related food research, nutrition education, and practice. Marks has co-organized—with Donald B. Thompson, emeritus professor of food science at Penn State—a workshop sponsored by the Rock Ethics Institute on “The Ethical Challenges and Policy Implications of Industry-Funded Health-Related Food Research” (Penn State, March 2008), a follow-up symposium entitled “Industry Sponsorship and Health-Related Food Research Institutional Integrity, Ethical Challenges, and Policy Implications” (Penn State, March 2012); and the Rock Ethics Institute’s Food Ethics Lecture Series 2011–12. Marks took the lead role in developing Penn State’s new dual-title Ph.D. program in bioethics (the first of its kind in the country) that allows and requires students to combine bioethics with one of a number of other disciplines in their dissertation.
When Oct 03, 2006
from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 101 Pattee Library
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JONATHAN H. MARKS

 

Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities, and Law; Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute; and Director of the Bioethics Program, Penn State

Jonathan H. Marks is Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities, and Law at The Pennsylvania State University; Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute; and Director of the Bioethics Program. He is currently a non-residential fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.  He leads a collaborative research project that is jointly funded by the Rock Ethics Institute and the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics (through its Lab on Institutional Corruption), exploring the ethical and policy implications of industry sponsorship of health-related food research, nutrition education, and practice.  Marks has co-organized—with Donald B. Thompson, emeritus professor of food science at Penn State—a workshop sponsored by the Rock Ethics Institute on “The Ethical Challenges and Policy Implications of Industry-Funded Health-Related Food Research” (Penn State, March 2008), a follow-up symposium entitled “Industry Sponsorship and Health-Related Food Research Institutional Integrity, Ethical Challenges, and Policy Implications” (Penn State, March 2012); and the Rock Ethics Institute’s Food Ethics Lecture Series 2011–12.  Marks took the lead role in developing Penn State’s new dual-title Ph.D. program in bioethics (the first of its kind in the country) that allows and requires students to combine bioethics with one of a number of other disciplines in their dissertation.

Marks has published widely on the intersections of law, ethics, human rights, and policy, and his work has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, American Journal of Law and Medicine, American Journal of Bioethics, and theHastings Center Report (among others).  He has also authored or co-authored op-eds for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and The Times (London)(among others). In addition to his work on food ethics, he writes about, teaches courses, and has co-organized an international conference on neuroethics and neurolaw.  He has also written extensively about the role of health professionals in detention and interrogation in the “war on terror”—part of an ongoing larger project that explores the relationship between professional ethics and human rights.

Jonathan Marks spent 2009–2011 in residence at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard, and prior to joining Penn State, was a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities.  Marks is also a barrister and academic member of Matrix Chambers, London.  While in full time legal practice, he was involved in a number of landmark cases including the Pinochet case and the Olivieri case—the latter arising from a dispute between a physician-researcher and the drug company sponsor of her clinical trials.

"The Future of Food Ethics"

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What do we mean when we talk about “food ethics”?  What role have industry, government, the academy, and other actors played in shaping what we know about food, and our understanding of the various issues identified as questions of “food ethics”?  This lecture will explore the contours of food ethics, outlining (among other things) the ethical implications of the complex webs of human relations on which our food networks depend, as well as the practical impacts of food production and consumption on the environment, and human and animal health.  The lecture will highlight the most pressing issues in food ethics that we face locally, nationally, and globally; identify the tools that ethics might helpfully bring to the table; and explore the potential contribution concepts such as “food justice” to policy discussions.  Unlike previous lectures in the series, this will be a shorter lecture, leaving time for formal responses as well as general discussion.

April 23, 2012
3:00 p.m.
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

 

"The Future of Bioethics: From the Microscope to the Macroscopic"

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Recent, well-publicized debates in bioethics have revolved around highly charged issues such as stem cell research and physician-assisted suicide. Although the bioethics literature goes well beyond these topics, it still fails to explore many of the issues encompassed by the term “bioethics” as broadly conceived by Van Rensselaer Potter, the biochemist who coined it. This lecture will trace the evolution of bioethics and explore the challenges posed for those who wish to navigate some of the poorly-charted and uncharted waters. It will also explore the contribution that different academic disciplines have to offer a broader bioethics agenda—one that is as ready to tackle difficult questions of social justice and the environment as it is to discuss stem cells and genetics.

October 3, 2006
3:00 p.m.
Foster Auditorium, 101 Pattee Library