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The Meaning of Modern Human Genetic Variation

When Mar 20, 2008
from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Where Berg Auditorium, 100 Life Sciences Building
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MARC FELDMAN

 

Department of Biological Sciences and Director, Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies, Stanford University

Marc Feldman is Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor of Biological Sciences at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1972. He is director of the Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies at Stanford. Originally trained in mathematics, his research has applied mathematics to genetics, biological evolution, and cultural evolution. He is the author of six books and over four hundred scientific articles. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the California Academy of Science. His work on demography of China has been recognized with honorary professorships at two Chinese universities. He has collaborated closely with Israeli scientists and was awarded an honorary doctorate of philosophy by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research on human population genetics was awarded Paper of the Year in Biomedical Sciences by The Lancet in 2003. He has been academic director of the Bridging the Rift Foundation which, since 2004, has arranged extensive scientific collaborations between Jordanian and Israeli scientists. Since its foundation in 1983, he has been a trustee and member of the Science Steering Committee of the Santa Fe Institute.


Marc Feldman will present two talks on the nature, origins, and use of human variation. The first talk, "Genomic Ancestry of Humans and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis," will be a presentation of a more purely biological and technical nature, and will include reports of new and as yet unpublished research, while the second, "The Meaning of Modern Human Genetic Variation," will have more of an ethics focus.

Genomic Ancestry of Humans and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

Modern molecular biology allows us to study human genetic variation on a scale far exceeding previous possibilities. This allows ancestry at the continental and, in some cases, finer level to be estimated. These estimates can be related to what is known and/or speculated about patterns of human migration. In some cases, infectious human pathogens can be studied in the same way. Mycobacterium TB is such a case, in which its patterns of worldwide genomic variation can be compared to those of its human carrier.

March 19, 2008
7:00 p.m.
110 Wartik Building

The Meaning of Modern Human Genetic Variation

Modern molecular biology allows us to study human genetic variation on a scale far exceeding previous possibilities. This allows ancestry at the continental and, in some cases, finer level to be estimated. These estimates can be related to what is known and/or speculated about patterns of human migration. The risks associated with such studies in terms of debates about the biology of "race," and medical, behavioral or other uses of information about ancestry will be discussed.

March 20, 2008
4:00 p.m.
Berg Auditorium, 100 Life Sciences Building