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The Role and Value of Intercollegiate Athletics

Myles Brand assumed his duties as president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association January 1, 2003. He is the fourth chief executive officer of the Association. Brand was president from 1994 through 2002 of Indiana University, an eight-campus institution of higher education with nearly 100,000 students, 17,000 employees and a budget of $3.4 billion. Brand also served as president at the University of Oregon from 1989 to 1994.
When Jan 26, 2004
from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Where Hub-Robeson Center, Auditorium
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MYLES BRAND

NCAA President

Myles Brand assumed his duties as president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association January 1, 2003. He is the fourth chief executive officer of the Association.

Brand was president from 1994 through 2002 of Indiana University, an eight-campus institution of higher education with nearly 100,000 students, 17,000 employees and a budget of $3.4 billion. Brand also served as president at the University of Oregon from 1989 to 1994.

Born May 17, 1942, Brand earned his BS in philosophy from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1964, and his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Rochester in 1967. Brand’s other administrative posts include provost and vice-president for academic affairs, Ohio State University, 1986-89; coordinating dean, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Arizona, 1985-86; dean, faculty of social and behavioral sciences, Arizona,1983-86; director, Cognitive Science Program, Arizona, 1982-85; head, department of philosophy, Arizona,1981-83; chairman, department of philosophy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1972-80. He began his career in the department of philosophy, University of Pittsburgh, 1967-72.

Brand has also served as chair of the board of directors of the Association of American Universities (AAU), 1999-2000; a member of the board of directors, 1992-97, and executive committee, 1994-97, of the American Council on Education (ACE); and a member of the board of directors of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC), 1995-98. He served too as a board member of the American Philosophical Association and of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development, the umbrella organization of Internet2.

His academic research investigates the nature of human action. His work focuses on intention, desire, belief and other cognitive states, as well as deliberation and practical reasoning, planning and general goal-directed activity. He has also written extensively on various topics in higher education, such as tenure and undergraduate education. Brand’s nationally acclaimed January 2001 speech to the National Press Club, “Academics First: Reforming Intercollegiate Athletics,” focused on how the disconnect between intercollegiate athletics and education “jeopardizes the essential mission of our universities.”

At Indiana, Brand oversaw the largest single privatization effort in the institution’s history – the consolidation of the IU Medical Center Hospitals and Methodist Hospital to form Clarian Health Partners. He initiated an innovative marketing plan designed to more effectively tell the story of Indiana University’s first-class programs and educational opportunities. He helped Indiana University become a national leader in information technology, and he led the largest and most successful endowment campaign in the university’s history. Brand was also instrumental in initiating the Central Indiana Life Sciences project, with IU in the leadership role.

Myles Brand is married to Peg Zeglin Brand, a faculty member in Philosophy and Gender Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has one son and two granddaughters.

The Role and Value of Intercollegiate Athletics

In this paper, Dr. Brand explores why the role and importance of intercollegiate athletics is undervalued in the academy. He discusses perceptions toward college sports from the Standard View and the Integrated View, and compares the remarkably similar relationships between music and athletics as activities and their dissimilar academic standing. While music has gained acceptance as performance art, athletics has been ostracized by a prejudice against the body within the American academy. He concludes that a balance between the mental and physical produces a harmonious relationship recognized by the ancient Greek’s approach to education.