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A message from Peter Singer - Looking for students to found a local group for The Life You Can Save


Those of you who have been inspired, by The Girl in the Cafe or by some other means, to take an interest in the fight against global poverty might like to have a look at the following open letter I received from the well-known moral philosopher and activist Peter Singer: A message from Peter Singer - Looking for students to found a local group for The Life You Can Save - Read More…

A New Perspective on the Importance of 'The Rock'


I joined The Rock Ethics Institute (or, more colloquially, 'The Rock') as Assistant Director in August, 2013. It is fair to say, then, that I am new to 'The Rock' and Penn State. Being new to a position and a university involves learning a great deal, and quickly. A New Perspective on the Importance of 'The Rock' - Read More…

A Recap of the 2014 Moral Literacy Colloquium


On April 25-26, the Rock Ethics Institute hosted the 2014 Moral Literacy Colloquium, Educating for Moral Literacy. The Colloquium brought together leading scholars and educators for discussions and presentations of moral literacy education and ethical leadership. A Recap of the 2014 Moral Literacy Colloquium - Read More…

Addressing Intersectional Oppression


2012 Rock Ethics Institute Stand Up Award Recipient Julian Haas Class of 2012, Sociology, Penn State University Park Addressing Intersectional Oppression - Read More…

Announcing the 2014 Stand Up Award Honorees


For Zachary Brubaker, taking a stand means uniting the blind and sighted to promote respect and equality for workers with disabilities. For Maggie Cardin, taking a stand means working to educate emerging teachers to recognize and prevent depression and suicide in students. Announcing the 2014 Stand Up Award Honorees - Read More…

Are Fossil Fuel Industry Commercials Encouraging Americans to Engage In Unethical Climate Change Causing Behavior?


ClimateEthics has written frequently about some obvious ethical problems with cost arguments often made by opponents of climate change policies. Among other problems with cost arguments are that they (a) don't acknowledge duties, obligations, and responsibilities to those most vulnerable to climate change impacts, (b) ignore obligations to prevent human rights violations, (c) wind up being used to give polluters permission to cause great harm to human health and the environment around the world, and, (d) often ignore the costs of doing nothing to reduce the threat of climate change. For instance, see: Ethical Problems With Cost Arguments Against Climate Change Policies: The Failure To Recognize Duties To Non-citizens. Are Fossil Fuel Industry Commercials Encouraging Americans to Engage In Unethical Climate Change Causing Behavior? - Read More…

Citizen Kane: Questions for Reflection


Citizen Kane is filmed as a series of long takes, composed in-depth to eliminate the necessity for narrative cutting within major dramatic scenes. The film uses very little shot/counter-shot. Why is this so important to the way we experience the film visually? Citizen Kane: Questions for Reflection - Read More…

Dean Brady on Honor, Integrity, and Pride


The following text was published on the Schreyer Honors College blog by Dean Christian Brady, Dean Brady has agreed to have us cross-post it here due to its relevance to the topics we are discussing on the Speak Up blog in our Being Penn State series. We provide it as an invitation for you to share your thoughts concerning what Penn Staters can and should be proud to be. Dean Brady on Honor, Integrity, and Pride - Read More…