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Michael Burroughs receives national recognition

Dr. Michael D. Burroughs, Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute and Senior Lecturer of Philosophy at Penn State University, has been selected as an NEH Summer Scholar from a national applicant pool to attend the Moral Psychology and Education Summer Institute, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Michael Burroughs in SwedenDr. Michael D. Burroughs, Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute and Senior Lecturer of Philosophy at Penn State University, has been selected as an NEH Summer Scholar from a national applicant pool to attend the Moral Psychology and Education Summer Institute, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The Endowment is a federal agency that, each summer, supports these enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities, and cultural institutions, so that faculty can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines.

Dr. Burroughs will participate in the summer institute entitled "Moral Psychology and Education: Putting the Humanities to Work."  The four-week program will be held at Grand Valley State University and co-directed by Dr. Deborah Mower, professor of philosophy and religion at Youngstown State University and Dr. Phyllis Vandenberg, professor of philosophy at Grand Valley State University.

The 25 scholars selected to participate in the program each receive a stipend of $3,300 to cover their travel, study, and living expenses. 

Topics for the 23 seminars and institutes offered for college and university teachers this summer include Alexis de Tocqueville and American Democracy; American Maritime History; Beowulf and Old Norse-Icelandic Literature; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; The Commonplace Book and Its American Descendants; Confucian Asia; Ernest J. Gaines and the Southern Experience; The History of Political Economy; The Land Ethic, Sustainability, and the Humanities; Mapping, Text, and Travel; Modern Mongolia; Moral Psychology and Education; Native American Histories and the Land; The Ottoman Empire, Europe, and the Mediterranean World, 1500-1800; Presuppositions and Perception; Problems in the Study of Religion; Religion, Secularism, and the English Novel, 1719-1897; Teaching the Reformation; Tokyo: High City and Low City; Urban Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora; Veterans in American Society; The Visual Culture of the Civil War and Reconstruction; Westward Expansion and the Constitution

The approximately 521 NEH Summer Scholars who participate in these programs of study will teach over 91,175 American students the following year.