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USDA's MyPlate criticised for "mixing science with the influence of powerful agricultural interests"

The USDA created  ChooseMyPlate.gov, a simple guide to help Americans eat better.  But Walter Willett, chair of nutrition at Harvard's School of Public Health argues that the USDA's MyPlate "mixes science with the influence of powerful agricultural interests, which is not the recipe for healthy eating."  So Harvard has created its own plate, the Health Eating Plate.

Among the substantive criticisms of the USDA's MyPlate:

MyPlate does not tell consumers that whole grains are better for health than refined grains; its protein section offers no indication that some high-protein foods -- fish, poultry, beans, nuts -- are healthier than red meats and processed meats; it is silent on beneficial fats; it does not distinguish between potatoes and other vegetables; it recommends dairy at every meal, even though there is little evidence that high dairy intake protects against osteoporosis but substantial evidence that high intake can be harmful; and it says nothing about sugary drinks. Finally, the Healthy Eating Plate reminds people to stay active, an important factor in weight control, while MyPlate does not mention the importance of activity.

See Harvard serves up its own 'Plate' Healthy Eating Plate shows shortcomings in government's MyPlate   Take a look, and share your thoughts...