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Previous Bioethics Events

by Rob Peeler Mar 17, 2015

Job Talk - Stripped to the Bone: Sequencing Queerness in the Comic Strip Work of Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz

When: Feb 16, 2017 at 9:30 AM
Where: 216 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802

In this talk, I develop a queer theory of comics strip form by exploring the comics work of mixed-media artists Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz. Both New York residents of lower Manhattan at key moments in the development of contemporary U.S. queer culture—gay liberation and the AIDS crisis respectively—Brainard and Wojnarowicz showed artistic affinity with the comics medium throughout their short-lived but prodigious careers in the 1970s and 1980s. In the early 1970s, Brainard adopted the classic comic strip character Nancy in a series of paper works that functioned as enlarged comic strips; in these panels, Brainard depicted Nancy in a variety of radical sexual and social positions (as transgendered, high on drugs, performing in a pornographic movie, and much more) that allowed viewers to imagine a traditionally American icon as a potentially queer one inhabiting multiple, non-synchronous identities. Little more than a decade later, in David Wojnarowicz’s graphic memoir, 7 Miles a Second (1988-1993), the artist and his collaborators James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook, used the visual disjoint between comic strip panels to formally dramatize the experience of social alienation and physical pain associated with being a queer person with AIDS. Through a historically situated close reading of these two works, I show how Brainard and Wojnarowicz each deployed the formal codes of the comics medium to articulate emergent affective orientations towards transformations in alternative sexual cultures; consequently, I argue for an understanding of comic strip sequence as a formal expressions of modern queer sexuality as an unpredictable unfolding of countless erotic possibilities. Job Talk - Stripped to the Bone: Sequencing Queerness in the Comic Strip Work of Joe Brainard and David Wojnarowicz - Read More…

Brown Bag Series: The Ethics of Yoga: - Walt Whitman’s Spiritual Democracy

When: Feb 02, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

The yoga world has been rocked by a number of scandals in recent years. It seems that many teachers of yoga have not heeded the basic ethical guidelines found in Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, especially the imperative to practice ahimsa, non-harming of others. One might be excused in wondering if yoga has any ethics at all. I believe that yoga can represent an important contribution to contemporary conversations about ethics. Brown Bag Series: The Ethics of Yoga: - Walt Whitman’s Spiritual Democracy - Read More…

Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions

When: Dec 09, 2016 at 8:00 AM
Where: Virtual and Room 116, Bio Behavioral Health Building

The purpose of this symposium is to gain a collective, interdisciplinary, and international understanding of the issues surrounding food ethics in the foodservice environment. Ethics of foodservice relates to the human conduct along the supply chain of production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. Food away from home (FAFH), particularly in the foodservice environment, is an increasing proportion of our food consumption and expenditure. The complexity of this system, and the significance of the FAFH activity in our lives makes this an important discussion. Panelist will present this specific point of view, followed by a brief discussion. We hope you will be able to join us and contribute to this discussion. Virtual Interdisciplinary Research Symposium in Foodservice Decisions - Read More…

Brownbag Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World

When: Nov 17, 2016 at 12:00 PM
Where: 133 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802

There is a widespread assumption that the American food system after World War II was transformed—toward an increasingly industrialized production of crops, more processed foods, and diets higher in fat, sugar, and calories—as part of a unified system. In this talk, Bryan McDonald brings together the history of food, agriculture, and foreign policy to explore how food was deployed in the first decades of the Cold War to promote American national security and national interests, a concept referred to as food power. Brownbag Series - Food Power and Food Ethics: Food Security in a Complex World - Read More…

Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability

When: Nov 03, 2016 at 1:00 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

This paper sketches four archetypal characterizations of how food will be produced, processed, distributed and consumed over the coming half century—a time in which all manner of social association will be influenced by climate change, growing scarcity of resources relative to human population and climate change. The archetypes are offered as scenarios that facilitate advance thinking at the level of total food systems, and are not represented as exhausting all the forces and possible adaptations that are relevant. They are intended to provoke a critical attitude toward certain presumptions that may be widely shared, especially among advocates of alternative food systems. The analysis places special emphasis on how each scenario reflects and incorporates a response to environmental sustainability and to food justice. Four Archetypes for Future Food Systems: Justice and Sustainability - Read More…

Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect

When: Oct 05, 2016 at 5:00 PM
Where: Lewis Katz Auditorium

After the fiasco of the Iraq War of 2003, the West pushed for a new mandate through the UN called the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in 2005. This new mandate revived ideas of humanitarian intervention that had been called into question from the detritus of Iraq. No lessons were learned. After R2P came Libya, a society now in ruins, and then came Syria, a country whose civil war had been fanned along even as no good outcome seemed on the horizon. This talk will explore the landscape of intervention and its perils. Co-sponsored Event - Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect - Read More…

Care vs. Autonomy: Nudging for Health and Relational Judgment in Reflective Professional Practice

When: Sep 29, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Where: 110 Henderson Building, University Park, PA 16803

The lecture will discuss the tensions between the ethical obligation to respect autonomy and the ethical obligation to provide care and promote human flourishing. It identifies the question this relationship poses for bioethics, psychology, and the helping professions such as medicine, nursing, social work, counseling, and public health. The pros and cons of three ways to resolve this tension are considered: (1) by appeal to reason, (2) by designing or curating contextual conditions influencing choice (often called “choice architecture” or “nudging”) in ways that constrain autonomy but do not violate its core value, and (3) by appeal to relational judgment in communicative and reflective professional practice. Care vs. Autonomy: Nudging for Health and Relational Judgment in Reflective Professional Practice - Read More…

Ethical literacy across health and healthcare: What might it look like? How do we get there?

When: Apr 14, 2016 at 12:00 PM
Where: Rock Conference Room, 133 Sparks Building

Citizen and patient involvement is increasingly promoted as a way to attain sustainable health and quality healthcare. This strategy is acknowledged to pose many practical challenges and to require improved rates of health literacy. Less discussed, is that involvement initiatives across health also present patients, citizens and policy makers with complex, dynamic ethical challenges that require greater ethics literacy and debate if they are to be addressed effectively. The presentation will, by drawing on examples such as childhood vaccination, stigma and ‘vaping’, examine what an ‘engaging’ health ethic might look like and the developments that are needed to attain it. Ethical literacy across health and healthcare: What might it look like? How do we get there? - Read More…

A Schilling Memorial Lecture - Natural Freedom: Human/Nature Nondualism in Japanese Thought

When: Apr 01, 2016 at 3:30 PM
Where: Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802

Westernized policies and practices in Japan have contributed more to the exacerbation than to the amelioration of environmental destruction, the nondualistic conception of the relation between humans and nature that can be found in much of traditional Japanese thought and in some modern Japanese philosophies may well help us rethink the dualistic presuppositions and false dichotomies that lie at the ideological roots of our ecological problems. We need to learn to think of and experience the world, not in terms of humans versus nature, nor even just in terms of humans in cooperation with nature, but rather in terms of humans in nature, humans as part of nature, humans as participating in nature. And this entails, I mean to show in this exploration of Japanese thought, a rethinking of nature, of naturalness, of humanity, and of freedom. A Schilling Memorial Lecture - Natural Freedom: Human/Nature Nondualism in Japanese Thought - Read More…

Public Health Ethics: Implications for Research Integrity

When: Mar 02, 2016 at 5:00 PM
Where: 110 Henderson Building

SARI@PSU approved event led by Laura Williamson, Associate Professor, Biobehavioral Health and the Rock Ethics Institute Public Health Ethics: Implications for Research Integrity - Read More…