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Seven local residents cycling to DC; raising awareness about climate change

The trip is sponsored by Pennsylvania Interfaith Power & Light (paipl.org), a state-wide non-profit that has its main offices in State College. The bikers will be staying overnight in church basements and giving talks to colleges and religious communities along the way. Cricket Hunter, executive director of PA IPL, said “Morality is for everyone, but religious people have a special responsibility to speak out about injustice in the world. We want to energize congregations to begin acting on their moral principles, and this trip is a great step in that direction.”

On May 2, Jonathan Brockopp, director of the religion and ethics initiative at the Rock Ethics Institute, will give his last lectures for the semester, and then hop on his bicycle to ride the first leg of a 4-day journey to Washington, D.C. Brockopp is part of a seven-person team, riding their bikes to raise awareness about the ethical dimensions of climate change.

This Saturday, April 19, they will be meeting at Tussey Mountain for a 30-mile training ride. They will meet on Bear Meadows road (entrance to the go-karts) at 11 a.m.

“Most people know the scientific and political dimensions of climate change,” Brockopp said, “but few have thought deeply about the moral implications.” According to Brockopp, these are among the most important climate issues: “People right now are suffering from changes in our climate, and the floods and droughts we have seen recently are only harbingers of what may be coming down the pike.”

The trip is sponsored by Pennsylvania Interfaith Power & Light, a state-wide non-profit that has its main offices in State College. The bikers will be staying overnight in church basements and giving talks to colleges and religious communities along the way. Cricket Hunter, executive director of PA IPL, said “Morality is for everyone, but religious people have a special responsibility to speak out about injustice in the world. We want to energize congregations to begin acting on their moral principles, and this trip is a great step in that direction.”

When the bikers reach Washington, Hunter will join them to meet with members of the Pennsylvania congressional delegation. “Our message to them is that the clock is ticking,” Hunter said, adding, “we only have a few years to turn our emissions around, so Congress needs to join our communities of faith and act now.”

Bike trip information

Profiles of riders

Contact information for Jonathan Brockopp: (c) 321-4308; (h) 861-3106; brockopp@psu.edu

Contact information for Cricket Hunter: (o) 876-2597; (h) 861-6171; chunter@paipl.org