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Genocide and the Logic of Political Modernity—Philosophy Colloquium

Anne O’Byrne, associate professor of philosophy at Stony Brook University, and Martin Shuster, associate professor of philosophy at Goucher College, presenting
by David Price Nov 03, 2020
When Nov 13, 2020
from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Where Virtual (Zoom)
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The Rock Ethics Institute is pleased to present the next Philosophy Colloquium, Friday, November 13, 2020, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Zoom. 

Anne O'ByrneMartin ShusterAnne O’Byrne, associate professor of philosophy at Stony Brook University, and Martin Shuster, associate professor of philosophy at Goucher College, will give a talk entitled “Genocide and the Logic of Political Modernity.”

To join us, please click on this Zoom link and enter passcode 783372.

The speakers have provided some materials to consider before their talk. When you register for the session, links to the online materials will be sent to you with your Zoom registration confirmation.


About Anne O'Byrne: From  Natality and Finitude to my current project on democracy, generational life, and genocide, this work has happened at the intersection of ontology and politics. Articles and chapters investigate the political and ontological questions that arise around embodiment ("The Politics of Intrusion," “Umbilicus”), gender ("The Excess of Justice"), labor ("Symbol, Exchange and Birth"), teaching ("Pedagogy without a Project"), and worldiness (“Amery, Arendt and the Future of the World”). Much of it has dealt with the work of Heidegger, Arendt, Derrida, and Jean-Luc Nancy. Translations, alone and with collaborators, include three books of Nancy’s:  Being Singular Plural (with Robert Richardson, Stanford, 2000),  Being Nude (with Carlie Anglemire, Fordham, 2014) and  Corpus II (Fordham, 2013).  Subjects and Simulations (Lexington, 2014), on the work of Jean Baudrillard and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, was edited with Hugh Silverman and Logics of Genocide: The Structures of Violence and the Contemporary World, was edited with Martin Shuster.


About Martin Shuster: Martin Shuster's research interests are in European philosophy, political philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, critical theory, and philosophy of religion (esp. Jewish thought and philosophy). He has particular interests in philosophers writing in the wake of the Nazi genocide (Adorno, Levinas, Arendt), in earlier German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), in the connections between Anglophone and European philosophy, and in how philosophy intersects with religion and the arts (especially film and television). He teaches courses across the history of philosophy, from ancient to contemporary. From 2016-2020, he directed the Judaic studies program. Through the Goucher Prison Education Partnership (GPEP), he has also taught at the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, and in 2019, he was a visiting professor at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.