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Joshua Inwood: Lack of grassroots could be problematic for commissions pursuing racial justice

In the Generocity of Philadelphia, Rock Ethics Institute senior research associate Joshua F.J. Inwood questions whether the top-down structure of two commissions pursuing racial justice will only serve the tension-breaking interests of elected officials, or whether they can reach their objectives without a grassroots mandate.
by David Price Aug 03, 2020

“Generally, commissions emerge out of the work of grassroots organizations. When it is top down, it is bit of a more controlled process,” Penn State associate professor of geography and senior research associate in the Rock Ethics Institute Joshua F.J. Inwood tells the Generocity of Philadelphia. Generocity is a publication that focuses on how nonprofit, social enterprise and other mission groups can maximize their impact.

In the article, Inwood discusses the Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation commissions in Boston and San Francisco, which were created by the citys' respective district attorneys in response to recent demands to advance racial justice.

Inwood questions whether the top-down structure of the two commissions will only serve the interests of elected officials who want things to calm down, or whether they will achieve their stated objectives despite not having a grassroots mandate.

You can read the full article here

Joshua Inwood












Joshua Inwood
Rock Ethics Institute Senior Research Associate
Associate Professor of Geography