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The empathy option: The science of how and why we choose to be empathetic

We can choose to put ourselves in situations where we will feel empathy — the experience of understanding and actually sharing the feelings of someone else — or we can choose to avoid such situations. Penn State psychologist Daryl Cameron is studying how we make that decision, and whether we can be encouraged to be more empathetic.
by Betsy VanNoy Dec 11, 2019
The empathy option: The science of how and why we choose to be empathetic

Daryl Cameron, assistant professor of psychology

We can choose to put ourselves in situations where we will feel empathy — the experience of understanding and actually sharing the feelings of someone else — or we can choose to avoid such situations. Penn State psychologist Daryl Cameron is studying how we make that decision, and whether we can be encouraged to be more empathetic.

Read more here.

Quote from the article:

“It’s easy to think that people might avoid empathy because they just don’t want to feel bad,” Cameron said. “But what if it’s because empathy is effortful, taxing and fatiguing? It’s hard work to try to get inside someone else’s head and feel what they’re feeling. One might be afraid of getting it wrong, or not knowing someone well enough to know what they’re feeling.”